A change that involves the insertion of a consonant or vowel sound to the middle of a word (2023)

A change that involves the insertion of a consonant or vowel sound to the middle of a word (1) 更多“A change that involves the insertion of a consonant or vowel sound to the middle of a word is known as .”相关的问题

第1题

Part A

Directions: Read the following four texts. Answer the questions below each text by choosing A, B, C or D . Mark your answers on ANSWER SHEET 1.

No one should be forced to wear a uniform. under any circumstance. Uniforms are demanding to the human spirit and totally unnecessary in a democratic society. Uniforms tell the world that the person who wears one has no value as an individual but only lives to function as a part of a whole. The individual in a uniform. loses all self-worth.

There are those who say that wearing a uniform. gives a person a sense of identification with a larger, more important concept. What could be more important than the individual himself? If an organization is so weak that it must rely on cloth and buttons to inspire its members, that organization has no fight to continue its existence. Others say that the practice of making persons wear uniforms, say in a school, eliminates all envy and competition in the matter of dress, such that a poor person who cannot afford good quality clothing need not be belittled by a wealthy person who wears expensive, quality clothing. Those persons conveniently ignore such critical concepts as freedom of choice, motivation, and individuality. If all persons were to wear the same clothing, why would anyone strive to be better? It is only a short step from forcing everyone to wear the same clothing to forcing everyone to drive the same car, have the same type of house, eat the same types of foods. When this happens, all incentive to improve one’s life is removed. Why would parents bother to work hard so that children could have a better life than they had when they know that their children are going to be forced to have exactly the same life that they had?

Uniforms also hurt the economy. Right now, billions of dollars are spent on the fashion industry yearly. Thousands of persons are employed in designing, creating, and marketing-different types of clothing. If everyone were forced to wear uniforms, artistic personnel would be unnecessary. Sales persons would be superfluous as well. Why bother to sell the only items that are available? The wearing of uniforms would destroy the fashion industry which in turn would have a ripple effect on such industries as advertising and promotion. Without advertising, newspapers, magazines, and television would not be able to remain in business. One entire information and entertainment industries would founder.

The writer's tone in this passage is ______.

A.curious

B.impassioned

C.humorous

D.calm

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第2题

Part A

Directions: Read the following three texts. Answer the questions on each text by choosing A, B, C or D. Mark your answers on ANSWER SHEET 1.

The automobile has many advantages. Above all, it offers people freedom to go wherever and whenever they want to go. The basic purpose of a motor vehicle is to get from point A to point B as cheaply, quickly, and safely as possible. However, to most people, cars are also personal fantasy machines that serve as symbols of power, success, speed, excitement, and adventure.

In addition, much of the world's economy is built on producing motor vehicles and supplying roads, services, and repairs for those vehicles. Half of the world's paychecks are auto related.

In the United States, one of every six dollars spent and one of every six non-farm jobs are connected to the automobile or related industries, such as oil, steel, rubber, plastics, automobile services, and highway construction.

In spite of their advantages, motor vehicles have many harmful effects on human lives and on air, water, land, and wildlife resources. The automobile may be the most destructive machine ever invented. Though we tend to deny it, riding in cars is one of the most dangerous things we do in our daily lives.

Since 1885, when Karl Benz built the first automobile, almost 18 million people have been killed by motor vehicles. Every year, cars and trucks worldwide kill an average of 250, 000 people--as many as were killed in the atomic bomb attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki--and injure or permanently disable ten million more. Half of the world's people will be involved in an auto accident at some time during their lives.

Since the automobile was introduced, almost three million Americans have been killed on the highways--about twice the number of Americans killed on the battlefield in all U. S. wars. In addition to the tragic loss of life, these accidents cost American society about $60 billion annually in lost income and in insurance, administrative, and legal expenses.

Streets that used to be for people are now for cars. Pedestrians and people riding bicycles in the streets are subjected to noise, pollution, stress, and danger.

Motor vehicles are the largest source of air pollution, producing a haze of smog over the world's cities. In the United States, they produce at least 50% of the country's air pollution.

Cars represent people's _________.

A.occupation

B.identity

C.life style

D.fame

(Video) English Consonants - Place of Articulation

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第3题

(Video) VOWELS & CONSONANTS | What's the difference? | Learn with examples

Part A

Directions: Read the following three texts. Answer the questions on each text by choosing A, B, C or D. Mark your answers on ANSWER SHEET 1.

The automobile has many advantages. Above all, it offers people freedom to go wherever and whenever they want to go. The basic purpose of a motor vehicle is to get from point A to point B as cheaply, quickly, and safely as possible. However, to most people, cars are also personal fantasy machines that serve as symbols of power, success, speed, excitement, and adventure.

In addition, much of the world's economy is built on producing motor vehicles and supplying roads, services, and repairs for those vehicles. Half of the world's paychecks are auto related. In the United States, one of every six dollars spent and one of every six non-farm jobs are connected to the automobile or related industries, such as oil, steel, rubber, plastics, automobile services, and highway construction.

In spite of their advantages, motor vehicles have many harmful effects on human lives and on air, water, land, and wildlife resources. The automobile may be the most destructive machine ever invented. Though we tend to deny it, riding in cars is one of the most dangerous things we do in our daily lives.

Since 1885, when Karl Benz built the first automobile, almost 18 million people have been killed by motor vehicles. Every year, cars and trucks worldwide kill an average of 250 000 people -- as many as were killed in the atomic bomb attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki -- and injure or permanently disable 10 million more. Half of the world's people will be involved in an auto accident at some time during their lives.

Since the automobile was introduced, almost three million Americans have been killed on the highways -- about twice the number of Americans killed on the battlefield in all US wars. In addition to the tragic loss of life, these accidents cost American society about $ 60 billion annually in lost income and in insurance, administrative, and legal expenses.

Streets that used to be for people are now for cars. Pedestrians and people riding bicycles in the streets are subjected to noise, pollution, stress, and danger.

Motor vehicles are the largest source of air pollution, producing a haze of smog over the world's cities. In the United States, they produce at least 50% of the country's air pollution.

Cars represent people's ______.

A.occupation

B.wealth

C.life style

D.fame

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第4题

(Video) Sound Changes Middle to Modern English Metathesis Epenthesis Prothesis English and Spanish Examples

Part A

Directions: Read the following three texts. Answer the questions on each text by choosing A, B, C or D. Mark your answers on ANSWER SHEET 1.

When Vice President Cheney spoke last year at Westminster College, its president, Fletcher Lamkin, expected a foreign policy address. Winston Churchill delivered his historic "Iron Curtain" speech there, and the school has hosted speeches by other foreign leaders.

To Lamkin's surprise, Cheney delivered a speech against Sen. John Kerry.

Lamkin, a retired Army brigadier general(准将) and the former dean of academics at West Point, felt he had been misled. He e-mailed the college community to express his disappointment and said that in the interest of balance, he would offer Kerry a chance to speak. Very quickly his email made its way to the national media, and Lamkin found himself in the middle of a coast-to-coast quarrel. Lamkin says he was portrayed as "another college president trying to liberalize his students, and another president who is trying to poison tile minds of students and turn them into flaming liberals."

Lamkin needed help in handling the criticism. So, like a growing number of administrators caught up in controversy, he turned to a specialist in crisis management for advice on how to explain his actions to the press and public in a clear and simple way.

There are no data on how often colleges use crisis managers, but those in the field say that in a world of emails, blogs and wall-to-wall news coverage, demand is increasing. Christopher Simpson, who assisted Lamkin, says a recent crisis conference he hosted drew representatives of 70 institutions, more than expected.

Earlier this year, the University of Colorado turned to Simpson for help. But his hiring led to a short-term controversy of its own, in large part because he is being paid $350 an hour. Typically, crisis consultants charge $2,500 to $3,500 a day. Simpson has since signed a$150,000 one-year contract to assess the university's public relation needs and help improve its discolored image.

Not everyone is enthusiastic about crisis consultants. Linda Gray, assistant vice president at the University of Central Florida, says that "to a certain extent, the worse the crisis, the closer to home you should deal with it." Gray, who was in charge of public relations at the University of Florida when a serial killer murdered several students in 1990, says, "You ought to be dealing with the crisis, not explaining things to somebody else."

Where did Winston Churchill deliver his "Iron Curtain" speech?

A.In New York.

B.In Chicago.

C.At Oxford University.

D.At Westminster College.

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第5题

(Video) Learn Vowels for Kids: A E I O U | Vooks Animated Storybooks

If you’ve ever been on a jury, you might have noticed that a funny thing happens the minute you get behind closed doors. Everybody starts talking about themselves. They say what they would have done if they had been the plaintiff or the defendant. Being on a jury reminds me why I can’t tolerate talk radio. We Americans seem to have lost the ability to talk about anything but our own experiences. We can’t seem to generalize without stereotyping or to consider evidence that goes against our own experience.

I heard a doctor on a radio show talking about a study that found that exercise reduces the incidence of Alzheimer’s. And caller after caller couldn’t wait to make essentially the opposite point: “Well, my grandmother never exercised and she lived to 95.” We are in an age summed up by the saying: “I experience, therefore I’m right.” Historically, the hallmarks of an uneducated person were the lack of ability to think critically, to use deductive reasoning to distinguish the personal from the universal. Now that seems an apt description of many Americans.

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第6题

Part A

Directions: Read the following four texts. Answer the questions below each text by choosing A, B, C or D . Mark your answers on ANSWER SHEET 1.

A great deal of attention is being paid today to the so called digital divide—the division of the world into the info(information) rich and the info poor. And that divide does exist today. My wife and I lectured about this looming danger twenty years ago. What was less visible then, however, were the new, positive forces that work against the digital divide. There are reasons to be optimistic.

There are technological reasons to hope the digital divide will narrow. As the Internet becomes more and more commercialized, it is in the interest of business to universalize access—after all, the more people online, the more potential customers there are. More and more governments, afraid their countries will be left behind, want to spread Internet access. Within the next decade or two, one to two billion people on the planet will be netted together. As a result, I. now believe the digital divide will narrow rather than widen in the years ahead. And that is very good news because the Internet may well be the most powerful tool for combating world poverty that we've ever had.

Of course ,the use of the Internet isn't the only way to defeat poverty. And the Internet is not the only tool we have. But it has enormous potential. To take advantage of this tool, some impoverished countries will have to get over their outdated anti-colonial prejudices with respect to foreign investment. Countries that still think foreign investment is an invasion of their sovereignty might well study the history of infrastructure (the basic structural foundations of a society)in the United States. When the United States built its industrial infrastructure, it didn't have the capital to do so. And that is why Americas Second Wave infrastructure- including roads, harbors, highways, ports and so on—were built with foreign investment. The English, the Germans, the Dutch and the French were investing in Britain's former colony. They financed them. Immigrant Americans built them. Guess who owns them now? The Americans. I believe the same thing would be true in places like Brazil or anywhere else for that matter. The more foreign capital you have helping you build your Third Wave infrastructure, which today is an electronic infrastructure, the better off you're going to be. That doesn't mean lying down and becoming fooled, or letting foreign corporations run uncontrolled. But it does mean recognizing how important they can be in building the energy and telecom infrastructures needed to take full advantage of the Internet.

Digital divide is something______.

A.getting worse because of the Internet

B.the rich countries are responsible for

C.the world must guard against

D.considered positive today

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(Video) 24 Consonant Sounds In English | Speak English Clearly With Correct Pronunciation | Accent Training

FAQs

What is the process of inserting a vowel or consonant in a word? ›

In phonology, epenthesis (/ɪˈpɛnθəsɪs, ɛ-/; Greek ἐπένθεσις) means the addition of one or more sounds to a word, especially in the beginning syllable (prothesis) or in the ending syllable (paragoge) or in-between two syllabic sounds in a word.

What do you call the process of changing from one vowel sound to another? ›

Vowelization is the substitution of a vowel sound for a liquid (l, r) sound (e.g. “bay-uh” for “bear”). Vowelization typically resolves by the age of 6.

What is it called when sound change results in the addition of a sound in the middle of a word? ›

Epenthesis. In the process of epenthesis a sound segment is added.

What is phonetic insertion? ›

Insertion: When an extra sound is added between two others. This also occurs in the English plural rule: when the plural morpheme z is added to "bus," "bus-z" would be unpronounceable for most English speakers, so a short vowel (the schwa, [ə]) is inserted between [s] and the [z].

Which article is used before a consonant word or any vowel with a consonant sound *? ›

If the first letter makes a vowel-type sound, you use "an"; if the first letter would make a consonant-type sound, you use "a." However, even if you follow these basic rules when deciding to use "a" or "an," remember that there are some exceptions to these rules. "A" goes before words that begin with consonants.

What are the 3 types of sound change? ›

Elision, aphaeresis, syncope, and apocope: all losses of sounds. Elision is the loss of unstressed sounds, aphaeresis the loss of initial sounds, syncope is the loss of medial sounds, and apocope is the loss of final sounds.

What are the 4 types of assimilation? ›

Assimilation is a phonological process where a sound looks like another neighboring sound. It includes progressive, regressive, coalescent, full and partial assimilation.

What are the 3 types of assimilation? ›

Assimilation can divide into three type; progressive assimilation, regressive assimilation, and reciprocal assimilation.

What is a sound effect called? ›

A sound effect (or audio effect) is an artificially created or enhanced sound, or sound process used to emphasize artistic or other content of films, television shows, live performance, animation, video games, music, or other media. Traditionally, in the twentieth century, they were created with foley.

What are the 4 types of articulation? ›

The four types of articulation disorders are collectively referred to as SODA, which stands for Substitution, Omission, Distortion, and Addition.

What is the name of this action it happens when two sounds occur in sequence and some aspect of one segment is taken or copied by the other? ›

Assimilation: when two sound segments occur in sequence and some aspect of one segment is taken or copied by the other, the process is known as Assimilation. E.g. have \ \ in have to\ \ as if written as hfta (from voiced v to voiceless f.

What is another word for insertion in phonology? ›

In phonology and phonetics, epenthesis is the insertion of an extra sound into a word. Adjective: epenthetic. Verb: epenthesize. Also known as intrusion or anaptyxis.

What is vowel insertion? ›

Vowel sounds may be inserted into a word by two mechanisms: insertion of a vocalic articulatory gesture (epenthesis), or retiming of existing gestures to produce a vowel-like transition between consonants (intrusion).

What is assimilation in phonetics? ›

Assimilation is a sound change in which some phonemes (typically consonants or vowels) change to become more similar to other nearby sounds. A common type of phonological process across languages, assimilation can occur either within a word or between words.

What article we use if a word starts with a vowel but pronounce as consonant? ›

Use a when the noun or adjective that comes next begins with a consonant sound. Use an when the noun or adjective that comes next begins with a vowel sound. Remember that what matters is the pronunciation, not the spelling. Here are some examples of the article a followed by words that begin with consonant sounds.

Which article is used before words which has a consonant sound in the beginning? ›

The real rule is this: You use the article "a" before words that start with a consonant sound and "an" before words that start with a vowel sound.

Which article is used before words that start with a consonant sound and is not referring to one specific thing? ›

Use a before nouns that begin with a consonant sound, and use an before nouns that begin with a vowel sound. Use the article a or an to indicate any non-specified member of a group or category.

What are the 2 types of consonant sounds? ›

Consonants can be grouped into two major groups: voiced and unvoiced consonants.

What are the 3 types of vowel sounds? ›

In this section, we'll look at the three ranges of vowel sounds: monophthongs (single vowel sounds within a syllable), diphthongs (two vowels sounds combined within a syllable), and triphthongs (three vowels sounds combined within a syllable).

What are the three types of consonants? ›

In English there are approximately 24 consonants and these are arranged into five main groups: (1) plosives, (2) nasals, (3) fricatives, (4) affricates, and (5) approximants.

What are the three states of sound? ›

The Speed of Sound: Sound travels at different speeds depending on what it is traveling through. Of the three mediums (gas, liquid, and solid) sound waves travel the slowest through gases, faster through liquids, and fastest through solids.

What is the of assimilation? ›

assimilation, in anthropology and sociology, the process whereby individuals or groups of differing ethnic heritage are absorbed into the dominant culture of a society.

What is an example of assimilation quizlet? ›

The process by which a minority group abandons its own culture and adopts the cultural practices of the dominant group in society. An innocent girl saw another girl throwing snowballs at someone's car. The very next day this innocent girl also starts throwing snowballs at somebody's car .

What is assimilation give an example? ›

assimilation. noun [ U ] /əˌsɪm·əˈleɪ·ʃən/ the process of becoming similar to others by taking in and using their customs and culture: The assimilation of immigrants into American culture has been a constant feature of US history.

What are the 3 types of acculturation? ›

When these two dimensions are crossed, four acculturation strategies are defined: assimilation, separation, integration, and marginalization.

What is assimilation and elision? ›

Summary: Assimilation is the process by which a sound changes to become more similar – or even identical – to a neighbouring sound. Elision is the process by which a sound 'goes missing': it isn't pronounced, although it would be pronounced in a very slow, careful style of speech.

What are the two types of acculturation? ›

Two major types of acculturation, incorporation and directed change, may be distinguished on the basis of the conditions under which cultural contact and change take place.

What is consonant epenthesis? ›

Epenthesis is a term in phonology. It refers to adding one or more sounds to a word. If it is added at the beginning, it is called prothesis. If added at the end of the word, it is called paragoge. There are two types of epenthesis: when a consonant is added, and when a vowel is added.

What is the phonetic transcription of vowel? ›

What are the English Vowel Sound IPA symbols (International Phonetic Alphabet)? English has 20 vowel sounds. Short vowels in the IPA are /ɪ/-pit, /e/-pet, /æ/-pat, /ʌ/-cut, /ʊ/-put, /ɒ/-dog, /ə/-about. Long vowels in the IPA are /i:/-week, /ɑ:/-hard,/ɔ:/-fork,/ɜ:/-heard, /u:/-boot.

How do we produce vowel and consonant sounds? ›

A consonant sound is a sound where the airflow is stopped, either partially or completely, when the sound is uttered. On the other hand, a vowel sound is a sound where the airflow is unstopped when the sound is produced. The vowel sounds are the rhyme or shift of our language.

What are the types of vowel articulation? ›

The tongue can be moved to the front, centre or back (Frontness/Backness). Thus, vowels can be classified into front (i, e), central (a, or the indistinct vowel in 'of'), or back (o, u).

What is it called when a word ends in a consonant sound and the next word starts with a vowel? ›

Liaison refers to the linking of the final consonant of one word with the beginning vowel (a, e, i, o, u) or vowel sound (generally, h and y) to the following word, as in the following example: vous imitez (voo zee‐mee‐tay).

What is an epenthesis example? ›

If you say "film" as "FIL-um," with two syllables, you've committed epenthesis. It isn't a punishable offense-in fact, it's not an offense at all. It is simply a natural way to break up an awkward cluster of consonants.

What are phonetic sounds called? ›

Phonetics. Phonetics is the study of the sounds of language. These sounds are called phonemes. There are literally hundreds of them used in different languages.

What are the types of consonant sounds? ›

consonant, any speech sound, such as that represented by t, g, f, or z, that is characterized by an articulation with a closure or narrowing of the vocal tract such that a complete or partial blockage of the flow of air is produced.

What is the sound source for consonants? ›

Consonant Acoustics

In voiced sounds one sound source is larynx vibration. In voiceless sounds the sound source is turbulence created at a constriction in the vocal tract. The filter is often considered to be just the effect of the vocal tract pipe forward of the sound source.

What is consonants and sounds explain? ›

A consonant is a speech sound that is not a vowel. It also refers to letters of the alphabet that represent those sounds: Z, B, T, G, and H are all consonants. Consonants are all the non-vowel sounds, or their corresponding letters: A, E, I, O, U and sometimes Y are not consonants. In hat, H and T are consonants.

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